XXVI – “The heavy is the root of the light”

The heavy is the root of the light;

The still is the lord of the restless.

Therefore the gentleman when travelling all day

Never lets the heavy-laden carts out of his sight.

It is only when he is safely behind wall and watchtowers

That he rests peacefully and is above worries.

How, then, should a ruler of ten thousand chariots

Make light of his own person in the eyes of the empire?

If light, then the root is lost;

If restless, then the lord is lost.

 

Oh to let the heavily-laden carts of my life’s work out of sight! Oh, to be secure within myself… to be safe within my walls and watchtowers, to rest peacefully, to be rooted. In tai chi, I practise this by scanning my movements. I see how a stable, rooted right leg makes for an active, light left leg. When I stand still, I know that I am rooted to the earth, and that I can move on the earth too. It is when I practise that I am safely behind walls and watchtowers, and if I don’t, I am lost.

 

 

 

Two types of democracy

Multi-party parliamentary democracies cannot implement referendum results. If a party is unified on the issue for referendum, they can include it in their manifesto; if they are divided on the issue for referendum, they cannot implement it.

So the Brexit vote cannot be implemented through parliament. Implementation can only be completed by a second referendum; the question being, should we remain in the single market or not?

 

 

Politics of the family, pt 3

Feminism has given me the understanding of the family as the first institution of property and hierarchy, so that my family can be better understood as the first institution of shared ownership and equality.

Does feminism have the character of critique? Only if it recognises the sanctity of marriage; otherwise it is a judgment of marriage, and would have a moral character.

By analogy to capitalism: Socialist critique wishes to enhance capitalism, or succeed it; socialist judgment condemns capitalism. How is it with feminism and the family?

In Corbyn’s hour, pt.2

That much astonishment met Corbyn’s insistence on achieving peace through dialogue – rather than a readiness to use nuclear weapons – shows above all the enduring audacity of peace.

Arms manufacture being what it is, if we don’t believe in peace, we believe in annihilation.

Do we believe in peace?

One important text in our shared religious heritage is the prophesy that one day people “shall beat their swords into ploughshares.” In what sense do we believe this? When – and who – shall do this?

If we pray with St Augustine, “O Lord, help me to be pure, but not yet”, we can be sure the help will come sooner than we thought.

It would not be difficult to end the production of weapons. That would be a good step in the direction of peace.

But if we don’t want it – yet – peace might be established later by the small group of people who survivor the nuclear bomb-fire.

And if not them, then new species will, over millions of years, emerge, and they will enjoy peace on Earth again.

And if not them, then as long as it takes – “but not yet”? Or now?

 

 

Abolish capitalism gently

The spirit of critique and the spirit of the capitalist are the same. They both took hold around about the same time. Neither pursues solidarity and peace.

Scientific socialism “critiques” capitalism as if it were capitalism’s natural outcome, as if it were the future of capitalism, as if it knew better. This holds for the communist idea of the future dictatorship of the proletariat as much as for the “progressive” politics of today.

True socialism – the politics of peace and solidarity – is descriptive of an ugly state of affairs and thinks about how to bring about greater peace and solidarity. It won’t critique capitalism, it won’t know better, it will condemn it because it believes better.

Socialism has been damaged by scientific socialism, by the idea that socialism is a parallel or a development of capitalism. True socialism simply seeks the (gentle) abolition of capitalism on moral grounds. Western society must repent of its capitalism, and its critique, and its future; not to reinstate the past, but to reinstate eternity in a new way.